Sulfated Caffeic Acid Dehydropolymer Attenuates Elastase and Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Emphysema in Rats: Sustained Activity and a Need of Pulmonary Delivery.

Saluja B, Li H, Desai UR, Voelkel NF, Sakagami M. (2014) Sulfated Caffeic Acid Dehydropolymer Attenuates Elastase and Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Emphysema in Rats: Sustained Activity and a Need of Pulmonary Delivery. Lung. 2014 May 16. (In Press) PMID: 24831783.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Although emphysema destroys alveolar structures progressively and causes death eventually, no drug has been discovered to prevent, intervene, and/or resolve this life-threatening disease. We recently reported that sulfated caffeic acid dehydropolymer CDSO3 is a novel potent triple-action inhibitor of elastolysis, oxidation, and inflammation in vitro, and therefore, a potential anti-emphysema agent. However, the in vivo therapeutic potency, duration and mode of actions, and effective route remain to be demonstrated.
METHODS:
Emphysema was induced in rats with human sputum elastase (HSE) combined with cigarette smoke extract (CSE). CDSO3 at 5, 30, or 100 μg/kg was dosed to the lung or injected subcutaneously at 2, 6, or 24 h before or 1 or 24 h or 1 week after the HSE/CSE instillation. At 1 h or 48 h or on day 21-22 or day 28, lungs were examined for airway-to-blood injurious barrier damage; their elastolytic, oxidative, and inflammatory activities; lung luminal leukocytes infiltration; functional treadmill exercise endurance; and/or morphological airspace enlargement.
RESULTS:
CDSO3, when dosed to the lung at 30 or 100 μg/kg, but not via systemic subcutaneous injection, significantly (43-93 %) attenuated HSE/CSE-induced (1) barrier damage measured by luminal hemorrhage and protein leak; (2) elastolytic, oxidative, and inflammatory activities measured with elastase, reduced glutathione, and TNFα levels, respectively; (3) luminal neutrophil infiltration and tissue myeloperoxidase activity; (4) functional impairment of exercise endurance; and (5) airspace enlargement, in both preventive and interventional dosing protocols. Notably, the effects were shown to last for 24 h at the greater 100-μg/kg dose, and the 1-week-delayed administration was also capable of attenuating the development of emphysema.
CONCLUSIONS:
CDSO3 is a novel, potent, long-acting, nonpeptidic macromolecule that inhibits HSE/CSE-induced elastolysis, oxidation, and inflammation in the lung and thereby attenuates the development of emphysema in rats, in both preventive and interventional manners, when administered locally to the lung.

Link to journal: http://www.springer.com/medicine/internal/journal/408